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Agung

Practical information on Agung

  • Hiking / Trekking
  • Volcano
  • Off the beaten track
4 / 5 - 2 reviews
How to get there
1h45 from Denpasar by moped
When to go
From April to October
Minimum stay
One day

Reviews of Agung

Simon Hoffmann Seasoned Traveller
185 written opinions

Mount Agung is the highest summit on Bali island, the top of this volcano that is sacred to the inhabitants culminates at a little over 9900 ft.

My suggestion:
See to it that you climb to the summit in time to see the sunrise, the view is simply magnificent even if the climb is not always easy.
My review

The climb up Mount Agung is not an easy thing but is really worth the effort, if only for the panorama that you see once up there. There are several possible paths to climb up there, the most difficult begins at Besakih temple and requires about 6 to 7 hours. Another path leaves from Pasar Agung temple and is of easier access, take note though that the climb is sometimes difficult and the ground can be very slippery, so being physically fit will make the hike much easier for you. It is also best to avoid the months of January and February during which Mount Agung receives downpours...

What can I say about the scenery except that it is magnificent? The luxuriant vegetation at the foot of the volcano slowly gives way to a more hostile setting of rock and ash on which nothing grows. Once up there, the view on the crater and the surroundings is grandiose. A climb reserved for trekking enthusiasts !

Perrine J. Seasoned Traveller
27 written opinions

At 3,140 metres tall, Mount Agung is Bali's highest point .

My suggestion:
This ascent isn't just a walk, it's a real climb, so you need to be in good physical condition. But I really recommend you to be there to see the sun rise, because the view from the summit is worth all the tea in China!
My review

For the whole of my trip in Bali, I tried to alternate between the countryside and the sea. Having had a great time on Amed's beaches I decided to go into the neighbouring dry foothills to climb Mont Agung, a superb volcano that had been watching me from afar for several days. I had hardly got to sleep when the alarm rang to announce the beginning of this physical challenge. Our little team of Belgians, French, Balinese and Poles started our climb, guided only by the halo of light thrown onto the steep slopes by our headlamps. Accompanied by the noise of the rain we climbed the 1,500 metres that separated us from the mist covered tops of the volcano. Once we finally started to see the crater, the walk became a climb and we were nearly crawling when we arrived just in time to see the sun rise.

The effort was well rewarded by breathtaking scenery: a sea of mist, an incredible view over the caldera, the sea below and, jutting through the clouds in the distance, Lombok's most famous volcano, Mount Rinjani. We finally understood why the Balinese call Mount Agung the home of the gods.