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The security in India

India, which receives around 6.5 million tourists a year, is relatively safe if you know how to respect the rules of the country and if you possess some common sense.

Environmental Safety

There are seismic, cyclonic and flood risks. You must be careful and check the weather reports regularly.

As in many countries in Asia, the level of hygiene in India is very poor, furthermore, either by philosophy or religion, the Indians leave certain diseases to proliferate, like the plague. Although vaccinations are not mandatory, do not hesitate to go to an international vaccination centre before you leave, to verify that you are up to date and do not need specific vaccinations depending on the region you are visiting or the length of your trip.

In the centre of large cities, there is no risk of malaria, but it is best to be careful in other areas. There are preventative treatments or simple actions to prevent the risk of catching malaria, such as wearing loose clothing from sunset, sleeping under a mosquito net, using a repellent, etc.

One of the biggest sanitary risks in India is drinking contaminated water. Indeed, it can be the carrier of many diseases. Avoid ice, straws (which are often recycled), eating raw foods or which could have been frozen. There exists however, a kind of individual straw that filters water, called the Lifestraw.

Personal Safety

As in all tourist countries, the risk of theft and scams is high. Always keep a copy of official documents and never hand over the originals, even to the police.

Police in India

The risk of a terrorist attack is also quite high in India, the last recorded attacks date back to 2013 and took place in different cities. One city is no safer than another but the regions of the North, including the borders with Pakistan, are areas to be avoided.

Regarding drugs, the law is very strict. Possession of drugs inevitably leads to prison. Be careful with your belongings, malicious people will sometimes slip drugs into them without your knowledge.

There are specific risks for women, especially when travelling alone. The figures show an increase in assaults and sexual harassment. So, be careful to respect the rules of etiquette in India. Avoid walking alone in quiet areas at night.

In conclusion, use common sense and be careful during excursions and visits and everything should go well on your trip to India.

Marie Foucaut
30 contributions
Updated 24 November 2015
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