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Uluwatu

Practical information on Uluwatu

  • Encounters with locals
  • Beach / Seaside Resort
  • Viewpoint
  • Water Sports
  • Place or Religious Monument
  • Festivals
  • Music
4 / 5 - 2 reviews
How to get there
20 minutes by scooter from Jimbaran
When to go
From March to June and September to November
Minimum stay
1 to 2 days

Reviews of Uluwatu

Solène Roy Seasoned Traveller
25 written opinions

Uluwatu's templeand surfing village along the cliffs.

My suggestion:
If you want to be independent then rent a scooter, and choose a hotel with a swimming pool because swimming can sometimes be difficult. At the temple, store your glasses, cameras and jewellery in your bag, and wear a hat and a sarong, both to protect you
My review

Uluwatu temple is home to monkey thieves. The clever animals stole a pair of glasses from us and the custodian sold us some lychees so we could make an exchange. We got our property back without too much trouble and continued our visit.

We traipsed around the temple and climbed to the top, passing some calmer monkeys on the way. The temple has a fantastic view of the sea and the cliffs. The only problem is that, according to the Hindu religion, women who are having their period are not allowed to enter the temple...

Uluwatu is also a surfing village with a slightly bohemian feel to it. It is really pleasurable to enjoy the view and the relaxed atmosphere while eating your breakfast in a warung in the cliff. Everyone knows each other here, and you quickly start to feel at home...it was difficult to leave to continue our journey around Indonesia!

Romain Beuvart Seasoned Traveller
89 written opinions

Uluwatu is on Bali's southern point and the main reason people go there is to visit the temple perched on the cliff.

My suggestion:
Surfers who want to try Uluwatu's surf (which is dangerous at high tide) can get to it via a cave. It is nice to go there at the end of the afternoon to see the sun set.
My review

Even though the interior of Uluwatu temple is closed to the (non-Hindu) public, you need to wear a sarong to visit, as is often the case in Bali. Here, it's included in the ticket price.

As you can't go into the temple, you go around it, and in the end the main attraction seems to be the multitude of little monkeys that are everywhere along the cliffs, which will certainly please the little ones if you are travelling with your family. Be careful about your glasses, cameras, etc. - there is a sign at the entrance, but I'm also going to remind you, the monkeys are skilful thieves!

Then there is the view, with a black sand beach below, and that very Balinese view of the UluwatuTemple in the background. The ideal moment to go there is at sun set.